7 Women Crushing The Tech Scene

By  | November 21, 2015

You’ve heard it before. Tech is the future. These 7 women below are proving that it takes a lot of different skillsets— business, computer science, commerce– to break through and be leaders in this competitive space. Want to crush the tech industry? Take a page from these powerhouse’s books.

SHERYL SANDBERG

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER OF FACEBOOK

This World Bank economist was an executive for Google before taking her skills to help Mark Zuckerberg monetize Facebook. But perhaps you know her better as the founder of Lean In. Sandberg wrote Lean In after hosting a TED talk in 2010 on ‘Why we have too few women leaders‘ and has since spurred the formation of Lean In circles around the globe to empower women professionally. Take a look, it’s totally worth it.

NONNY DE LA PEÑA

CEO OF EMBLEMATIC GROUP

Dubbed  the  Godmother of Virtual Reality, Nonny de la Peña is currently a senior research fellow at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at theUniversity of Southern California. Nonny de la Peña is revolutionizing how we tell stories. A former reporter, she is exploring the use of virtual reality for immersive journalism. Her feature, Hunger in Los Angeles, was shown at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival and her most recent piece about Syrian children refugees, Project Syria, was commissioned by the World Economic Forum to promote action amongst world leaders in 2014.

DORCAS MUTHONI

FOUNDER OF OPENWORLD LTD

Kenyan entrepreneur and computer scientist Dorcas Muthoni founded her own software consulting company, OPENWORLD LTD, at age 24. As an entrepreneur and computer scientist, Muthoni is working to see technology positively transform the lives of the African society, governments and enterprises. So far? We think she’s doing a pretty good job. Muthoni also founded AfChix, a mentorship and capacity building initiative for women in computing across Africa, to  encourage computing careers for young women and continuous career development for women in technology. Muthoni was named to the Internet Hall of Fame for her work in 2014 (Who knew there was even such a thing?!?).

GINNI ROMETTY

CHAIRWOMAN, PRESIDENT & CEO OF IBM

In 1981, age 24, Rometty  joined IBM as a systems engineer.  In 2012, 31 years later, Rometty became the company’s first female CEO. Forbes has named her 2015’s 13th most powerful woman and 67th most powerful person in the world, as well as making a mess of other ‘most influential’ lists. With Rometty at IBM’s helm, the 104-year-old tech company is transforming as she pushes the company to shift its business portfolio. She understands the trends around data, cloud, mobility better than anyone.

SUSAN WOJCICKI

CEO OF YOUTUBE

In 1999, before YouTube even existed, Wojcicki was Google’s first marketing manager. At Google, she worked on the initial viral marketing programs as well as the first Google doodles. Who doesn’t love a good Google doodle? She developed AdSense, which would become Google’s second largest source of revenue, and oversaw Google Video. The Google board bought YouTube at Wojcicki’s insistence, and she became the CEO of YouTube in early 2014. In 2015, Wojcicki was been named “the most important person in advertising” and described as “the most powerful woman on the internet” by Time Magazine.

ANGELA AHRENDTS

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF RETAIL AND ONLINE STORES AT APPLE

Remaining in retail, Angela Ahrendts transitioned from working in the fashion industry as the CEO of Burberry in 2014 to explore the tech world working for Apple. Ahrendts brings her deign skills to the innovative technology company, already well-known for its sleek look. Not is she the only female senior executive at Apple, but in 2014, Ahrendts reportedly earned over $70 million. This is more than any other executive at Apple, including CEO Tim Cook.  She was also named one of Fortune’s 50 Most Powerful Women in Business in 2014.

URSULA BURNS

CHAIRWOMAN & CEO OF XEROX

Mechanical Engineer-turned-CEO, Burns began her career at Xerox in 1980 as a summer intern and is now the first African-American woman CEO to head a Fortune 500 company. In 2015, Forbes named Ursula Burns was the 29th most powerful woman in the world. In a touchscreen and paperless world, Burns has ensured Xerox, famous for their photocopies, not only has a sustainable but profitable future.  How? Services presently represent 57% of Xerox’s total revenue and is only expected to grow to two-thirds by 2017.

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